James McBain of McBain

22nd hereditary Chief of the Ancient Clan MacBean–FSA Scot

Hughston McBain 21st hereditary Chief of the Ancient Clan MacBean

James McBain of McBain 22nd hereditary Chief of the Ancient Clan MacBean

Richard McBain of McBain Younger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James McBain of McBain Matriculated arms 15th February 1979 by Lord Lyon King of Arms as the 22nd Hereditary Chief of the Ancient Celtic Clan McBain (MacBean).
James followed his father Hughston McBain of McBain, 21st Chief from 1959 until his death in 1978. Hughston purchased land and had built the McBain Memorial Park 7 miles southwest of Inverness Scotland. This area is the duthis (homeland) of the Clan McBain (MacBean, Bean, Bain, Vean and all spellings. It is in a remote location near the village of Dores and the Dores Inn proprietor maintains a guest book for those who wish to leave comments. The Memorial includes a cairn at the top with a brief history of the Clan. There are footpaths around and through the memorial and a recently rebuilt gate at the entryway emblazoned with the Catt symbols of the Clan.

The McBain has three children, Christina, Jacquelyn, and Richard. Richard is designated as Richard McBain of McBain younger–the Tanist. McBain was born in Evanston Illinois to Hughston and Margaret on July 13, 1928. Hughston was the first in the family line to be born in the USA.

Presently the McBain is active as Vice President of Clan Chattan (Scotland), member of the Royal Scottish Dance Society (Edinburgh), speaker at Scottish events throughout the US and Canada. Retired as owner of Scot Photo Shop Tucson. He has visited over 50 Scottish games and events as a representative of the Standing Council of Scottish Chiefs (Edinburgh). The McBain published the book The Clan McBain (MacBean) A History of an Ancient Family in 2005.

History of Clan McBain – MacBean

The antecedents of Clan McBain (MacBean) arrived in Scotland as part of the Celtic migration about 500 A.D. Originally, they settled in the Kingdom of Dalriada (Dál Riata) in present-day Argyle. Around 1100 A.D. they moved to Lochaber at the southeast end of the Great Glen that runs from Inverness to Fort William. In those days Bean was a given name, not a surname, as the population was sufficiently small that surnames were not used. Later, surnames grew up, typically using Mac or “Son of” appended to a parental given name. Similarly, “Daughter of” is rendered Nic.

The MacBean Clan was closely allied with the Mackintosh Clan and the Clan Chattan Confederation. In the 1300’s a land dispute arose between Clan Mackintosh (and its allies) and Clan Cameron. The latter attempted to usurp lands vacated, but not relinquished, by Angus, Chief of Clan Mackintosh. Despite an adverse ruling by David II, King of Scots, Clan Cameron would not be moved. In 1370, a force of 400 from Clan Cameron attacked Clan Mackintosh at their seat at Badenoch. In an attempt to resolve the dispute, Robert III, King of Scots sponsored a contest of controlled combat between the feuding parties. Each side fielded thirty warriors, agreeing to abide by the outcome of this battle to the death. Clan MacBean was prominently represented in the forces of Mackintosh/Chattan, which defeated Clan Cameron (twenty-nine dead, one escaped). The conflict subsided until 1430 A.D. when Clan Cameron killed the son of the Mackintosh Chief. The MacBeans, battle arm of the Clan Chattan Confederation, killed the Chief of Clan Cameron and received high honors for this service.

Among the Christian MacBean Clan, there were several Saints Bean (700 A.D. Culdee; 1000 A.D. Aberdeen). Major Gillies MacBean was a battle hero in the forces of Bonnie Prince Charlie at the Battle of Culloden. Alexander Bain (1810-1877) was a prominent inventor of the electric clock, the printing telegraph, and the facsimile (FAX) machine. Alan Bean, U.S. astronaut, made a lunar landing with the Apollo 12 mission in 1969. Our honored Clan today is represented by James McBain, the McBain of McBain.

The Clan McBain.indb
James McBain of McBain Coat of Arms

The arms that appear on the front of the “Clan MacBean Register” are those arms granted by the Lord Lyon King of Arms Edinburgh Scotland to James McBain of McBain and are considered the personal property of the Chief. The Chief has given permission to use HIS arms on the Register.

In the United Kingdom the following rule applies: “According to the laws of heraldry in Scotland it is not legal for anyone to display as of personal right a coat of arms that has not been granted to him or her personally. People who ignore the law in this matter, not only look very foolish, but would under certain circumstances lay themselves open to prosecution.”

Many organizations around the world offer “family” arms for sale to be displayed by people with the name associated with the arms. In regard to Scottish arms, these offerings are not legal in the UK. Scotland is one of very few countries in the world which has a court to enforce the proper use of arms, namely the Lord Lyon Court of The King of Arms.

Those who can prove ancestry from Scotland may apply to this court for their own arms which will likely follow closely (but not exactly) the arms of the Chief To apply, simply write to Lord Lyon King of Arms, Register House, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.


Demi Wild Cat
Demi Wild Cat

 

To demonstrate affiliation with our clan we recommend use of the adage which forms the top of the Arms. In our case it is a demi-wildcat with a (red) targe Cor shield) on the foreleg, and the motto ‘TOUCH NOT A CATT BOT A TARGE” engraved on a belt and buckle surrounding the cat and targe. The buckle signifies allegiance to the Chief.

 

 


Motto
Motto

Motto

The elements of the Arms are a pictorial history of the Clan MacBean and where it came from. The Crest includes the motto at the top. It was changed slightly in 1958 from Touch not a catt bot a glove” to avoid the duplication with other Clans of Clan Chattan.

The Chief ordered this change at the request of the Lyon Court. These items of heraldic importance stand at the pleasure of the Chief and can be changed by the Chief at any time. They are not “carved in stone”.

 


Mantiling
Mantling

Mantling

Just below the Catt is the mantling, a cloth designed originally to protect the wearer from the sun. In the matriculation granted to Hughston and later to James the colors are blue and yellow.

 

 

 


Helmet and Livery
Helmet and Livery

Helmet and Livery

Below the mantling is the helmet — the appearance of the helmet indicates the rank of the wearer.  The Royal Family would have a gold one, Knights — steel with open visor, Barons — elaboration plus gold trim, Esquires and Gentleman — steel “pot design”. The Chiefs of the Clan MacBean are also Barons (of Kinchyle). Baron is a lesser title in Scotland than Chief.

 

 


Supporters

Supporters

There are generally Clan “Beasts” on either side of the Shield but in our case we have been awarded large boxwood trees.

 

 


 

earth
earth

Earth

Below the trees is a mound of earth representing the fact that the family has land in Scotland. The boxwood is our plant badge. In the days before Clan crests and even Clan tartans our family used the symbol of a plant native to our home area to distinguish ourselves from others.

 


Kinchyle
Kinchyle

Kinchyle

Finally we have the clan war cry or slogan, KINCHYLE. This has evolved from the Gaelic Cean-Coille meaning “head of the forest”. It is a difficult attempt to translate the Gaelic into English. The Clan motto TOUCH NOT A CATT BOT A TARGE is a warning to outsiders meaning roughly “if you attempt harm on the family you are advised to protect yourself against aggression”. The motto is similar to the motto of Scotland which is “Nemo me impune lacessit” meaning roughly “you cannot attack me with impunity”.

 


Red Lyon
Red Lyon

Red Lyon

In the most important part of the shield is the symbol of the Red Lyon, the ultimate representation of the Monarch of the Scots. It dates back to the time when we were living in the Kingdom of Dalriada (later Lorn), before our relationship with the Mackintoshes, before the time of Eva and probably before we identified ourselves under the name MacBean. The meaning is clear that we were a cadet of the old royal house, and despite few numbers and lack of wealth or power, our position was respected by other Chiefs and their families. We represented the Crown of what was to become Scotland.

 

 


Red Hand
Red Hand

The Red Hand

This emblem is in the second most powerful position on the Arms Shield. Today it is commonly associated with the County of Ulster in the North of Ireland. There is significant history to prove that before they came to Scotland the people known as Scots resided in what is now Ireland- The most powerful symbol of those Scots was the noble lineage Ui Neill or O’Neill. Before we had surnames this was the term for the ruling monarch. The famous legend of the “Red Hand” has several versions including the story of a powerful ruler who had too many sons! The land he possessed was to be divided among them but one island that all sons coveted could not be awarded without causing great family division. A plan was set in motion. Each of the sons was given a boat to paddle to the desired island. They all started at the same distance from the destination. The island was to be awarded to the first one of the sons to claim possession by placing his hand on the island. There was a furious volley of paddling and yelling as they started out. Within yards of the island one of the sons began falling behind, but he was so determined to claim the land that, taking his dirk (medium sized knife) in his left hand, He cut off His right hand and threw it onto the shore. He was the first to claim the land by rule! Thus the story of the bloody hand. This legend is also found in the stories of the Sommerled Chief of what was to become the MacDonalds.

 


The Sword

The Sword

In third position on the Arms Shield is the sword or Claymore (from the Gaelic claidbeamh mor). A powerful symbol from the earliest civilizations, the sword was much more than a weapon or tool. It was almost worshipped and frequently given endearing names. The old legend of Eva emerging from the sea that was told to generations of MacBeans pictured her coming out of the water with the sword, hilt high, forming a cross and bringing Christianity to Scotland, (this occurring centuries after St. Ninian and St. Columba). Closer to the truth is the fact that our history does portray a real Eva honored about the year 1300. The Chief of Clan Mackintosh (Angus) warmly welcomed the MacBean to the association, gave him lands and may have formed the modern Clan MacBean. We were to be the principal defender of Clan Chattan and our reputation as a warrior clan was born!

 


The Galley
The Galley

The Galley

The Galley in heraldry takes two forms: 1) The oars are in a rowing position. This may indicate a striving for battle or some distant shore. 2) The oars are crossed as in our case. This indicates a peaceful arrival. In Scottish lore the Galley is a symbol of the Norse Vikings who had such a great impact on Scotland from around 1100 to 1300. They are blamed for raids on the monasteries and the towns and villages around the perimeter of Scotland, England and Ireland. Many of them over the years married into Scottish families and were accepted as worthy members. The common name in Scotland today “Lochlan” means Viking. Most came from what is now Norway and for many years the King of Norway held the Orkney and other islands as his own property. Celebrations are still held in the Shetland and Orkney Islands celebrating their Norwegian heritage. The Galley symbol was important in the Clan Chattan confederation, and with our association as a “blood” Clan of Chattan, we take it as our own in the fourth quarter of the MacBean shield.

written by
McBain of McBain

We are talking about time periods almost before things were even written down. The official Mackintosh history puts the start of the “modern ” Clan Chattan at 1291. This was also the time frame we have for Mabean coming into the organization. Others say that a shadowy figure known as Gillichattan Mor was one of the earliest Chiefs of Chattan going back another 100 years.

The original group of Clans who formed the Clan Chattan were related as a family therefore the term “blood” was used for these earliest member of Clan Chattan.

Clan Mackintosh
Clan Cattanach
Clan Macpherson
Clan McBean (McBain)
Clan Macphail

The Clan Mackintosh brought other names to the association

Clan Shaw
Clan Farquharson
Clan McCombies (Thomas)

Later other Clans joined the Association:

Clan Macgillivray
Clan Davidson
Clan Maclean of Dochgarroch
Clan Tarril
Clan Smith (or Gow)
Clan Macqueen
Clan Andrish
Clan Clark
Clan Macintyre of Badenoch
Clan Macandrew

The Clan Chattan is unique in that it’s membership consists of members of the members of the constituent Clans.

McBain of McBain FSA SCOT
Questions come to me about the use of FSA SC0T.

FSA is a designation and title of those who are members of The Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.

This group was founded in 1780 the purpose was to preserve the ancient history of Scotland with emphasis on the archaeology of the country.

It has about 3000 members worldwide. Prospective members must be recommended by two current members. Emphasis is placed on published articles or books by the prospect.

+ James McBain of McBan

James McBain of McBain

22nd hereditary Chief of the Ancient Clan MacBean–FSA Scot

Hughston McBain 21st hereditary Chief of the Ancient Clan MacBean

James McBain of McBain 22nd hereditary Chief of the Ancient Clan MacBean

Richard McBain of McBain Younger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James McBain of McBain Matriculated arms 15th February 1979 by Lord Lyon King of Arms as the 22nd Hereditary Chief of the Ancient Celtic Clan McBain (MacBean).
James followed his father Hughston McBain of McBain, 21st Chief from 1959 until his death in 1978. Hughston purchased land and had built the McBain Memorial Park 7 miles southwest of Inverness Scotland. This area is the duthis (homeland) of the Clan McBain (MacBean, Bean, Bain, Vean and all spellings. It is in a remote location near the village of Dores and the Dores Inn proprietor maintains a guest book for those who wish to leave comments. The Memorial includes a cairn at the top with a brief history of the Clan. There are footpaths around and through the memorial and a recently rebuilt gate at the entryway emblazoned with the Catt symbols of the Clan.

The McBain has three children, Christina, Jacquelyn, and Richard. Richard is designated as Richard McBain of McBain younger–the Tanist. McBain was born in Evanston Illinois to Hughston and Margaret on July 13, 1928. Hughston was the first in the family line to be born in the USA.

Presently the McBain is active as Vice President of Clan Chattan (Scotland), member of the Royal Scottish Dance Society (Edinburgh), speaker at Scottish events throughout the US and Canada. Retired as owner of Scot Photo Shop Tucson. He has visited over 50 Scottish games and events as a representative of the Standing Council of Scottish Chiefs (Edinburgh). The McBain published the book The Clan McBain (MacBean) A History of an Ancient Family in 2005.

+ History of Clan McBain - MacBean

History of Clan McBain – MacBean

The antecedents of Clan McBain (MacBean) arrived in Scotland as part of the Celtic migration about 500 A.D. Originally, they settled in the Kingdom of Dalriada (Dál Riata) in present-day Argyle. Around 1100 A.D. they moved to Lochaber at the southeast end of the Great Glen that runs from Inverness to Fort William. In those days Bean was a given name, not a surname, as the population was sufficiently small that surnames were not used. Later, surnames grew up, typically using Mac or “Son of” appended to a parental given name. Similarly, “Daughter of” is rendered Nic.

The MacBean Clan was closely allied with the Mackintosh Clan and the Clan Chattan Confederation. In the 1300’s a land dispute arose between Clan Mackintosh (and its allies) and Clan Cameron. The latter attempted to usurp lands vacated, but not relinquished, by Angus, Chief of Clan Mackintosh. Despite an adverse ruling by David II, King of Scots, Clan Cameron would not be moved. In 1370, a force of 400 from Clan Cameron attacked Clan Mackintosh at their seat at Badenoch. In an attempt to resolve the dispute, Robert III, King of Scots sponsored a contest of controlled combat between the feuding parties. Each side fielded thirty warriors, agreeing to abide by the outcome of this battle to the death. Clan MacBean was prominently represented in the forces of Mackintosh/Chattan, which defeated Clan Cameron (twenty-nine dead, one escaped). The conflict subsided until 1430 A.D. when Clan Cameron killed the son of the Mackintosh Chief. The MacBeans, battle arm of the Clan Chattan Confederation, killed the Chief of Clan Cameron and received high honors for this service.

Among the Christian MacBean Clan, there were several Saints Bean (700 A.D. Culdee; 1000 A.D. Aberdeen). Major Gillies MacBean was a battle hero in the forces of Bonnie Prince Charlie at the Battle of Culloden. Alexander Bain (1810-1877) was a prominent inventor of the electric clock, the printing telegraph, and the facsimile (FAX) machine. Alan Bean, U.S. astronaut, made a lunar landing with the Apollo 12 mission in 1969. Our honored Clan today is represented by James McBain, the McBain of McBain.

+ McBain Coat of Arms
The Clan McBain.indb
James McBain of McBain Coat of Arms

The arms that appear on the front of the “Clan MacBean Register” are those arms granted by the Lord Lyon King of Arms Edinburgh Scotland to James McBain of McBain and are considered the personal property of the Chief. The Chief has given permission to use HIS arms on the Register.

In the United Kingdom the following rule applies: “According to the laws of heraldry in Scotland it is not legal for anyone to display as of personal right a coat of arms that has not been granted to him or her personally. People who ignore the law in this matter, not only look very foolish, but would under certain circumstances lay themselves open to prosecution.”

Many organizations around the world offer “family” arms for sale to be displayed by people with the name associated with the arms. In regard to Scottish arms, these offerings are not legal in the UK. Scotland is one of very few countries in the world which has a court to enforce the proper use of arms, namely the Lord Lyon Court of The King of Arms.

Those who can prove ancestry from Scotland may apply to this court for their own arms which will likely follow closely (but not exactly) the arms of the Chief To apply, simply write to Lord Lyon King of Arms, Register House, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.


Demi Wild Cat
Demi Wild Cat

 

To demonstrate affiliation with our clan we recommend use of the adage which forms the top of the Arms. In our case it is a demi-wildcat with a (red) targe Cor shield) on the foreleg, and the motto ‘TOUCH NOT A CATT BOT A TARGE” engraved on a belt and buckle surrounding the cat and targe. The buckle signifies allegiance to the Chief.

 

 


Motto
Motto

Motto

The elements of the Arms are a pictorial history of the Clan MacBean and where it came from. The Crest includes the motto at the top. It was changed slightly in 1958 from Touch not a catt bot a glove” to avoid the duplication with other Clans of Clan Chattan.

The Chief ordered this change at the request of the Lyon Court. These items of heraldic importance stand at the pleasure of the Chief and can be changed by the Chief at any time. They are not “carved in stone”.

 


Mantiling
Mantling

Mantling

Just below the Catt is the mantling, a cloth designed originally to protect the wearer from the sun. In the matriculation granted to Hughston and later to James the colors are blue and yellow.

 

 

 


Helmet and Livery
Helmet and Livery

Helmet and Livery

Below the mantling is the helmet — the appearance of the helmet indicates the rank of the wearer.  The Royal Family would have a gold one, Knights — steel with open visor, Barons — elaboration plus gold trim, Esquires and Gentleman — steel “pot design”. The Chiefs of the Clan MacBean are also Barons (of Kinchyle). Baron is a lesser title in Scotland than Chief.

 

 


Supporters

Supporters

There are generally Clan “Beasts” on either side of the Shield but in our case we have been awarded large boxwood trees.

 

 


 

earth
earth

Earth

Below the trees is a mound of earth representing the fact that the family has land in Scotland. The boxwood is our plant badge. In the days before Clan crests and even Clan tartans our family used the symbol of a plant native to our home area to distinguish ourselves from others.

 


Kinchyle
Kinchyle

Kinchyle

Finally we have the clan war cry or slogan, KINCHYLE. This has evolved from the Gaelic Cean-Coille meaning “head of the forest”. It is a difficult attempt to translate the Gaelic into English. The Clan motto TOUCH NOT A CATT BOT A TARGE is a warning to outsiders meaning roughly “if you attempt harm on the family you are advised to protect yourself against aggression”. The motto is similar to the motto of Scotland which is “Nemo me impune lacessit” meaning roughly “you cannot attack me with impunity”.

 


Red Lyon
Red Lyon

Red Lyon

In the most important part of the shield is the symbol of the Red Lyon, the ultimate representation of the Monarch of the Scots. It dates back to the time when we were living in the Kingdom of Dalriada (later Lorn), before our relationship with the Mackintoshes, before the time of Eva and probably before we identified ourselves under the name MacBean. The meaning is clear that we were a cadet of the old royal house, and despite few numbers and lack of wealth or power, our position was respected by other Chiefs and their families. We represented the Crown of what was to become Scotland.

 

 


Red Hand
Red Hand

The Red Hand

This emblem is in the second most powerful position on the Arms Shield. Today it is commonly associated with the County of Ulster in the North of Ireland. There is significant history to prove that before they came to Scotland the people known as Scots resided in what is now Ireland- The most powerful symbol of those Scots was the noble lineage Ui Neill or O’Neill. Before we had surnames this was the term for the ruling monarch. The famous legend of the “Red Hand” has several versions including the story of a powerful ruler who had too many sons! The land he possessed was to be divided among them but one island that all sons coveted could not be awarded without causing great family division. A plan was set in motion. Each of the sons was given a boat to paddle to the desired island. They all started at the same distance from the destination. The island was to be awarded to the first one of the sons to claim possession by placing his hand on the island. There was a furious volley of paddling and yelling as they started out. Within yards of the island one of the sons began falling behind, but he was so determined to claim the land that, taking his dirk (medium sized knife) in his left hand, He cut off His right hand and threw it onto the shore. He was the first to claim the land by rule! Thus the story of the bloody hand. This legend is also found in the stories of the Sommerled Chief of what was to become the MacDonalds.

 


The Sword

The Sword

In third position on the Arms Shield is the sword or Claymore (from the Gaelic claidbeamh mor). A powerful symbol from the earliest civilizations, the sword was much more than a weapon or tool. It was almost worshipped and frequently given endearing names. The old legend of Eva emerging from the sea that was told to generations of MacBeans pictured her coming out of the water with the sword, hilt high, forming a cross and bringing Christianity to Scotland, (this occurring centuries after St. Ninian and St. Columba). Closer to the truth is the fact that our history does portray a real Eva honored about the year 1300. The Chief of Clan Mackintosh (Angus) warmly welcomed the MacBean to the association, gave him lands and may have formed the modern Clan MacBean. We were to be the principal defender of Clan Chattan and our reputation as a warrior clan was born!

 


The Galley
The Galley

The Galley

The Galley in heraldry takes two forms: 1) The oars are in a rowing position. This may indicate a striving for battle or some distant shore. 2) The oars are crossed as in our case. This indicates a peaceful arrival. In Scottish lore the Galley is a symbol of the Norse Vikings who had such a great impact on Scotland from around 1100 to 1300. They are blamed for raids on the monasteries and the towns and villages around the perimeter of Scotland, England and Ireland. Many of them over the years married into Scottish families and were accepted as worthy members. The common name in Scotland today “Lochlan” means Viking. Most came from what is now Norway and for many years the King of Norway held the Orkney and other islands as his own property. Celebrations are still held in the Shetland and Orkney Islands celebrating their Norwegian heritage. The Galley symbol was important in the Clan Chattan confederation, and with our association as a “blood” Clan of Chattan, we take it as our own in the fourth quarter of the MacBean shield.

+ Blood Clans

written by
McBain of McBain

We are talking about time periods almost before things were even written down. The official Mackintosh history puts the start of the “modern ” Clan Chattan at 1291. This was also the time frame we have for Mabean coming into the organization. Others say that a shadowy figure known as Gillichattan Mor was one of the earliest Chiefs of Chattan going back another 100 years.

The original group of Clans who formed the Clan Chattan were related as a family therefore the term “blood” was used for these earliest member of Clan Chattan.

Clan Mackintosh
Clan Cattanach
Clan Macpherson
Clan McBean (McBain)
Clan Macphail

The Clan Mackintosh brought other names to the association

Clan Shaw
Clan Farquharson
Clan McCombies (Thomas)

Later other Clans joined the Association:

Clan Macgillivray
Clan Davidson
Clan Maclean of Dochgarroch
Clan Tarril
Clan Smith (or Gow)
Clan Macqueen
Clan Andrish
Clan Clark
Clan Macintyre of Badenoch
Clan Macandrew

The Clan Chattan is unique in that it’s membership consists of members of the members of the constituent Clans.

+ What is an FSA Scot?

McBain of McBain FSA SCOT
Questions come to me about the use of FSA SC0T.

FSA is a designation and title of those who are members of The Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.

This group was founded in 1780 the purpose was to preserve the ancient history of Scotland with emphasis on the archaeology of the country.

It has about 3000 members worldwide. Prospective members must be recommended by two current members. Emphasis is placed on published articles or books by the prospect.

McBain/MacBean Memorial Park

On June 6th 2014 the new McBain Plaque came home. Three years from the somber day we all learned from Tom Bean of the vandalism that befell the our family land.  Moira Geoffrion,  recently retired head of the University of Arizona Art Department created our new plaque. There were several goals in the replacement design.  First, should the new plaque look like bronze.  Second it most be made of materials that do not have the inherent value of bronze.  Third must stand the test of time.  Well done Moira!  Thanks to Lisa McFarlane who penned a new sign to help this plaque stay in the park.
ALL KINSMEN FIRST 
BRONZE, BRASS OF WORTH
MONEY I AM NOT
LEAVE IT TO A FRUGAL SCOT
SO STEAL ME NOT
LEAST YOU BE CURSED
AND DIE AMONGST

Phase 2 “Journey of the Cats”

After the thefts ending in 2011, we as a clan did the heavy lifting that Celts are famous for to restore our Park on be behalf of our Chief James McBain of McBain 22nd hereditary Chief of the ancient clan MacBean, our forefathers and all clans people around the world. On August 5th 2016 McBain Memorial Park hosted a rededication ceremony to celebrate the return of the cats. Many thanks to those that donated time, skills, and funds in recognition of the importance of this wee bite of land in the Highlands of Scotland. Peter McIllwain, Clan president, brought 22 clans people from Australia, Canada, and many parts of the United States to the celebration. In total we had fifty plus and a drone. Also present by way of Peter McIllwain was the MacBean tartan taken to the moon by Alan Bean Nov. 20, 1969. Yes it’s true this piece of tartan was taken to the moon, to the surface, and back to planet earth, and now back to the lands of the ancient clan MacBean in Kinchyle Scotland. If you’re a member you can read a great article about the trip to Scotland by Peter McIllwain in the members section of this site. If you are not you are missing out.

The journey began with an artist, Moira Marti Geoffrion, former head of the University of Arizona Art department, who accepted the request of Richard McBain Tanist to donate her skills to create the cats which stand today at McBain Memorial Park. Her sculptures give the Park a human touch with something created by her hands only. The cost of creating two one of a kind pieces and shipping them across the pond to Scotland, and installing, isn’t cheap. Thanks to James McBain of McBain’s passion to support all things Celtic. Our Chief has volunteered his time to attend all of the highland games in Arizona, some for over 38 consecutive years. Jude Mackenzie, who runs the Flagstaff Games in Arizona, took fundraising for this project as a challenge. As a thanks to James McBain of McBain, Jude challenged the other highland games of Arizona to match the Flagstaffs donations to the cause, and they did.

We MacBeans are part of a larger family and that family is Clan Chattan. August 4th 2016 at the Clan Chattan AGM Piper Cindi McIntosh-Behr volunteered to Pipe at the rededication and her contribution was amazing. Thank you Celia Mackintosh of Moy Hall for hosting the Cats, the plaque, and me Richard McBain of McBain younger during the entire construction efforts. Finally, a special thanks to Lisa McFarlane my partner… It was her idea to travel light, very light, so the Cats could be our luggage… saving hundreds.

 

In 1963, Hughston McBain of McBain 21st hereditary Chief was granted permission by the “road authorities” to place a sign on the A.862 road near Dores to mark the turn off to McBain Park.  Sadly it was taken only few years later.  By the late 1960s the second road sign installed by James McBain of McBain 22nd hereditary Chief was also removed.

Thanks to Allan MacBain, clan MacBean UK genealogist, for finding Alistair MacLeod, Principal Technician for the Highland Council Community Services, Inverness. In response to a request by Clan Tanist, Richard, for permission to replace the sign Alistair replied “We are constrained by the requirements contained within current legislation and guidance, and a modern day directional sign would need to fit within certain set standards.  As a compromise we would be content for a sign, similar to that shown in the photo supplied by you, to be erected at the rear of the verge next to the field boundary fence.”

With this great news in hand a new sign has been commissioned and will hopefully be installed by the summer of 2017.

Phase 4 The donation cairn

In honor of those institutions, and people, who donated 200.00 dollars or more to the Restore the McBain Memorial Park fund a cairn will placed in the Park with their names engraved on the stones.   The final design and placement within the Park for this important monument is still in the developmental stage so check back often for details.  Work on this project will start once Phase 3 (the road sign) is complete.  It’s not too late to have your name placed on a stone so consider a donation today. It is tax deductible.

Thomas Innes of Learney Lord Lyon from 1945 to 1969

It all started on September 26, 1958 when my grandfather Hughston M McBain petitioned the Lyon Court for Chiefship of the honorable “clan Mcbean”. Among the many requirements to become a Scottish chief the Lord lyon replied with an interesting suggestion:
H.M. Register House,Court of the Lord Lyon,
Edinburgh, 2, 21st October, 1958.

“…I think you should make an effort to repurchase Kinchyle, which is near Scaniport in
Inverness-shire…”
Yours sincerely.
Sir Thomas Inncs of Learney,
K.C.V.O.
H.M. Register House
Edinburgh 2, Scotland

 

 

 

 

Hughston M McBain 21st Chief of the clan McBain

In an excerpt from An American Scottish Chief, written by Hughston, Lord Lyon states that “the Scots looked down their noses at landless chiefs”. So the the land hunt was on! My Grandfather quickly found a challenge: “I soon learned that Scots won’t sell land!”. In 1959 Scots were naturally suspicious of foreigners (Americans in particular!) believing they might “ruin” the neighborhood with honkey-tonks, etc. The exact location of the old “Kinchyle Clan Lands” were then owned by the Baroness Burton (of Bass Ale – London). All efforts were made to buy 100 or 200 acres of the old Clan Lands. For almost 2 years she refused to sell at any price! Finally she agreed to sell a “wee piece”, about 2 acres up the hill side from the town of Dores. It wasn’t until the summer of 1961 that the area, now called McBain Memorial Park, was finished. Then it took 2 more years to get permission from the road authorities to put up a directional sign on the Dores road pointing the way to the Memorial Par!

Hughston McBain 21st chief of Clan McBain circa 1961. Satanding on the memorial spot of the park with the town of Dores and Loch Ness in the backgrond

The park was born in the summer of of 1960, by 1963 we had our first loss, heather. An excerpt from An American Scottish Chief tells the story.

“I engaged Mr. D.A. MacKinnon of Howden & Co., Inverness, to plant our heather. By the end of the third year we had 20 different varities and they were doing well. Then came trouble! Visitors from all over the world would not only clip the heather blossoms, but pull up whole plants! (And I’m afraid all too many were Scots!) Pondering as to a solution, I decided that the usual “Don’t touch” or “Keep off” signs would do no good. So (after a few Scotches one night)

I dreamed up signs with a lighter, friendlier touch: “McBain Memorial Park – No burial ground – no bodies around” “A thief one day, to our dismay, took plants away, he’ll rue that day!” “Please let us stay; we want to cheer you, on your way!” “Let me be, I’m just a Wee tree!” After these were installed, securely fastened, at least 80 percent of the pilfering stopped. I still believe the thieves were not professional – just clansmen who wanted “a wee bit of the Chief’s heather” to take home for planting.

+ The Plaque is Back
On June 6th 2014 the new McBain Plaque came home. Three years from the somber day we all learned from Tom Bean of the vandalism that befell the our family land.  Moira Geoffrion,  recently retired head of the University of Arizona Art Department created our new plaque. There were several goals in the replacement design.  First, should the new plaque look like bronze.  Second it most be made of materials that do not have the inherent value of bronze.  Third must stand the test of time.  Well done Moira!  Thanks to Lisa McFarlane who penned a new sign to help this plaque stay in the park.
ALL KINSMEN FIRST 
BRONZE, BRASS OF WORTH
MONEY I AM NOT
LEAVE IT TO A FRUGAL SCOT
SO STEAL ME NOT
LEAST YOU BE CURSED
AND DIE AMONGST
+ Journey of the Cats

Phase 2 “Journey of the Cats”

After the thefts ending in 2011, we as a clan did the heavy lifting that Celts are famous for to restore our Park on be behalf of our Chief James McBain of McBain 22nd hereditary Chief of the ancient clan MacBean, our forefathers and all clans people around the world. On August 5th 2016 McBain Memorial Park hosted a rededication ceremony to celebrate the return of the cats. Many thanks to those that donated time, skills, and funds in recognition of the importance of this wee bite of land in the Highlands of Scotland. Peter McIllwain, Clan president, brought 22 clans people from Australia, Canada, and many parts of the United States to the celebration. In total we had fifty plus and a drone. Also present by way of Peter McIllwain was the MacBean tartan taken to the moon by Alan Bean Nov. 20, 1969. Yes it’s true this piece of tartan was taken to the moon, to the surface, and back to planet earth, and now back to the lands of the ancient clan MacBean in Kinchyle Scotland. If you’re a member you can read a great article about the trip to Scotland by Peter McIllwain in the members section of this site. If you are not you are missing out.

The journey began with an artist, Moira Marti Geoffrion, former head of the University of Arizona Art department, who accepted the request of Richard McBain Tanist to donate her skills to create the cats which stand today at McBain Memorial Park. Her sculptures give the Park a human touch with something created by her hands only. The cost of creating two one of a kind pieces and shipping them across the pond to Scotland, and installing, isn’t cheap. Thanks to James McBain of McBain’s passion to support all things Celtic. Our Chief has volunteered his time to attend all of the highland games in Arizona, some for over 38 consecutive years. Jude Mackenzie, who runs the Flagstaff Games in Arizona, took fundraising for this project as a challenge. As a thanks to James McBain of McBain, Jude challenged the other highland games of Arizona to match the Flagstaffs donations to the cause, and they did.

We MacBeans are part of a larger family and that family is Clan Chattan. August 4th 2016 at the Clan Chattan AGM Piper Cindi McIntosh-Behr volunteered to Pipe at the rededication and her contribution was amazing. Thank you Celia Mackintosh of Moy Hall for hosting the Cats, the plaque, and me Richard McBain of McBain younger during the entire construction efforts. Finally, a special thanks to Lisa McFarlane my partner… It was her idea to travel light, very light, so the Cats could be our luggage… saving hundreds.

+ Road Sign

 

In 1963, Hughston McBain of McBain 21st hereditary Chief was granted permission by the “road authorities” to place a sign on the A.862 road near Dores to mark the turn off to McBain Park.  Sadly it was taken only few years later.  By the late 1960s the second road sign installed by James McBain of McBain 22nd hereditary Chief was also removed.

Thanks to Allan MacBain, clan MacBean UK genealogist, for finding Alistair MacLeod, Principal Technician for the Highland Council Community Services, Inverness. In response to a request by Clan Tanist, Richard, for permission to replace the sign Alistair replied “We are constrained by the requirements contained within current legislation and guidance, and a modern day directional sign would need to fit within certain set standards.  As a compromise we would be content for a sign, similar to that shown in the photo supplied by you, to be erected at the rear of the verge next to the field boundary fence.”

With this great news in hand a new sign has been commissioned and will hopefully be installed by the summer of 2017.

+ Cairn

Phase 4 The donation cairn

In honor of those institutions, and people, who donated 200.00 dollars or more to the Restore the McBain Memorial Park fund a cairn will placed in the Park with their names engraved on the stones.   The final design and placement within the Park for this important monument is still in the developmental stage so check back often for details.  Work on this project will start once Phase 3 (the road sign) is complete.  It’s not too late to have your name placed on a stone so consider a donation today. It is tax deductible.

+ History of the Park
Thomas Innes of Learney Lord Lyon from 1945 to 1969

It all started on September 26, 1958 when my grandfather Hughston M McBain petitioned the Lyon Court for Chiefship of the honorable “clan Mcbean”. Among the many requirements to become a Scottish chief the Lord lyon replied with an interesting suggestion:
H.M. Register House,Court of the Lord Lyon,
Edinburgh, 2, 21st October, 1958.

“…I think you should make an effort to repurchase Kinchyle, which is near Scaniport in
Inverness-shire…”
Yours sincerely.
Sir Thomas Inncs of Learney,
K.C.V.O.
H.M. Register House
Edinburgh 2, Scotland

 

 

 

 

Hughston M McBain 21st Chief of the clan McBain

In an excerpt from An American Scottish Chief, written by Hughston, Lord Lyon states that “the Scots looked down their noses at landless chiefs”. So the the land hunt was on! My Grandfather quickly found a challenge: “I soon learned that Scots won’t sell land!”. In 1959 Scots were naturally suspicious of foreigners (Americans in particular!) believing they might “ruin” the neighborhood with honkey-tonks, etc. The exact location of the old “Kinchyle Clan Lands” were then owned by the Baroness Burton (of Bass Ale – London). All efforts were made to buy 100 or 200 acres of the old Clan Lands. For almost 2 years she refused to sell at any price! Finally she agreed to sell a “wee piece”, about 2 acres up the hill side from the town of Dores. It wasn’t until the summer of 1961 that the area, now called McBain Memorial Park, was finished. Then it took 2 more years to get permission from the road authorities to put up a directional sign on the Dores road pointing the way to the Memorial Par!

Hughston McBain 21st chief of Clan McBain circa 1961. Satanding on the memorial spot of the park with the town of Dores and Loch Ness in the backgrond
+ History of the Thefts

The park was born in the summer of of 1960, by 1963 we had our first loss, heather. An excerpt from An American Scottish Chief tells the story.

“I engaged Mr. D.A. MacKinnon of Howden & Co., Inverness, to plant our heather. By the end of the third year we had 20 different varities and they were doing well. Then came trouble! Visitors from all over the world would not only clip the heather blossoms, but pull up whole plants! (And I’m afraid all too many were Scots!) Pondering as to a solution, I decided that the usual “Don’t touch” or “Keep off” signs would do no good. So (after a few Scotches one night)

I dreamed up signs with a lighter, friendlier touch: “McBain Memorial Park – No burial ground – no bodies around” “A thief one day, to our dismay, took plants away, he’ll rue that day!” “Please let us stay; we want to cheer you, on your way!” “Let me be, I’m just a Wee tree!” After these were installed, securely fastened, at least 80 percent of the pilfering stopped. I still believe the thieves were not professional – just clansmen who wanted “a wee bit of the Chief’s heather” to take home for planting.

Right shoulder sash

Left shoulder sash

Right shoulder Bow sash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lady Peggy of McBain of McBain

I am frequently asked, what is the proper way to wear a ladies tartan sash? .

Many women like to wear the tartan of their clan or their husband’s clan, but are not quite sure how to do it properly. Although the manner of wearing tartan sashes has had a customary significance even two centuries ago, there is no legal significance. However, a due respect for custom is important. The following suggestions are based upon a careful study of traditional practice, and bear the approval of the Lord Lyon King of Arms.

The proper way to wear the sash is over the right shoulder across the breast and secured by a pin or brooch on the right shoulder. Or it can be worn on the right shoulder in the form of a pleated fan or rosette, secured by a brooch, with both pieces of sash streaming down the back. The longer piece of fabric should be on the bottom and can be secured at the left back side of the waist with the shorter top piece of fabric hanging free. (see sketch)

If you are a the Queen of Great Britain, a member of the Royal Family, a Scottish clan chief, a wife of a Scottish clan chief or the wife of a Colonel or General of Scottish Regiments, the sash should be worn over the left shoulder and secured with a brooch on the left shoulder.(See sketch)

The Lord Lyon also has stated that a woman who has married outside of her clan but wishes to wear the tartan of her family rather than that of her husband, should wear the sash over her right shoulder, across the breast and secured at the left waist in a bow. Over the years, I have never seen anyone wear the sash in this manner. I think that trying to make a bow out the sash is cumbersome. However, anyone wishing to wear it this way should do so as it is totally appropriate.(See sketch)

 

 

 

 

 

Lady Peggy of McBain of McBain

This is an easy way to make a rosette out of your tartan sash. Often, women do not want to wear the sash across the breast beauty queen style, but prefer instead to keep the front of the dress free of the sash. Dancers, especially, use this style but it is appropriate for anyone.

Step 1: Fold the tartan sash in half.

Step 2: Take the top of the folded end and fold it back about 6″. Now fasten a rubber band in the middle of this new fold, making the sash look like a bow with a long tail. (See example)

Step 3: Fluff the folds so that the bow looks like a rosette, then use pins to fasten the rosette’s half circles together or, if you wish it to be more secure, use a needle & thread to stitch the half circles together. Pin your brooch in the middle of the rosette to hide the rubber band.

Step 4: Pin the rosette to the shoulder of your dress with the end of the sash hanging diagonally across your back.

Step 6: Arrange the two ends of the sash diagonally across your back so that they reach your hip, then fasten the bottom end to your hip with safety pins, making sure that the pins are not visible. The top end of the sash should hang free.

+ HOW TO WEAR A LADIES TARTAN SASH

Right shoulder sash

Left shoulder sash

Right shoulder Bow sash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lady Peggy of McBain of McBain

I am frequently asked, what is the proper way to wear a ladies tartan sash? .

Many women like to wear the tartan of their clan or their husband’s clan, but are not quite sure how to do it properly. Although the manner of wearing tartan sashes has had a customary significance even two centuries ago, there is no legal significance. However, a due respect for custom is important. The following suggestions are based upon a careful study of traditional practice, and bear the approval of the Lord Lyon King of Arms.

The proper way to wear the sash is over the right shoulder across the breast and secured by a pin or brooch on the right shoulder. Or it can be worn on the right shoulder in the form of a pleated fan or rosette, secured by a brooch, with both pieces of sash streaming down the back. The longer piece of fabric should be on the bottom and can be secured at the left back side of the waist with the shorter top piece of fabric hanging free. (see sketch)

If you are a the Queen of Great Britain, a member of the Royal Family, a Scottish clan chief, a wife of a Scottish clan chief or the wife of a Colonel or General of Scottish Regiments, the sash should be worn over the left shoulder and secured with a brooch on the left shoulder.(See sketch)

The Lord Lyon also has stated that a woman who has married outside of her clan but wishes to wear the tartan of her family rather than that of her husband, should wear the sash over her right shoulder, across the breast and secured at the left waist in a bow. Over the years, I have never seen anyone wear the sash in this manner. I think that trying to make a bow out the sash is cumbersome. However, anyone wishing to wear it this way should do so as it is totally appropriate.(See sketch)

+ How to make a rosette out of your tartan sash

 

 

 

 

 

Lady Peggy of McBain of McBain

This is an easy way to make a rosette out of your tartan sash. Often, women do not want to wear the sash across the breast beauty queen style, but prefer instead to keep the front of the dress free of the sash. Dancers, especially, use this style but it is appropriate for anyone.

Step 1: Fold the tartan sash in half.

Step 2: Take the top of the folded end and fold it back about 6″. Now fasten a rubber band in the middle of this new fold, making the sash look like a bow with a long tail. (See example)

Step 3: Fluff the folds so that the bow looks like a rosette, then use pins to fasten the rosette’s half circles together or, if you wish it to be more secure, use a needle & thread to stitch the half circles together. Pin your brooch in the middle of the rosette to hide the rubber band.

Step 4: Pin the rosette to the shoulder of your dress with the end of the sash hanging diagonally across your back.

Step 6: Arrange the two ends of the sash diagonally across your back so that they reach your hip, then fasten the bottom end to your hip with safety pins, making sure that the pins are not visible. The top end of the sash should hang free.

McBain Memorial Park overlooks Loch Ness!

Monster

Questions have come to me about Loch Ness and it’s fabled monster.
Most commonly the question is “have you ever seen the monster?
The answer is NO.
“Had your father ever seen the monster?
Again the answer is NO.

 

 

But lets go a little further. My father told the family a story about meeting a woman in Inverness who was a teacher at a local Primary school. Somehow the subject came up and she said “I am the most embarrassed woman in Scotland.” When asked why she said because for 16 years I have taught my students that there was no such thing as a monster in Loch Ness. Then one early bright evening (in the summer the sun stays up until 11PM or later.) I was looking at the still water of the loch when suddenly a great swirl of water and commotion was visible not far from the shore. Then I saw a hump, then what must have been a head but it looked like a huge snake head.

Then–

It disappeared.

Historically the first recorded tale of the Monster is in the story of Saint Columba who was traveling along the side of the Loch in around 530 AD he saw a great commotion in the waters and saw a great beast he told one of his traveling guards to swim out into the Loch and find out what it was. The story continues that the Monster headed towards the swimmer with mouth agape. At this point Columba raise his staff and called out in an unnatural voice to the Monster “ STOP and go no further.”

The Monster obeyed and the swimmer was able to swim to safety.

St. Columba proceeded towards what is now the town of Inverness where he was to meet with the “magicians” of the King of Scotland named Brude. The purpose of the journey was to attempt to bring Christianity to the King and his people. But that’s another story.

The chronicler of St. Columba was a monk who first put the life of Columba in paper.

The trouble with the story is that Adaman’s account of the events at Loch Ness took place almost 100 years after it happened. The reply was that most of the history at that time was verbal or folk tales that came down from one generation to another. This was the way it was done. We assume some elaboration took place but it is all we have.

Pictures of the monster which have appeared in print from around 1910 are about 60% false. But not all.

My only time spent with someone who saw the monster fairly regularly was the post mistress of the Dores Post office. Sitting in her living room she had a grand picture window looking out on the loch just a few yards from the water. When I put the question to her she said “Well, I have a friend who lives about a mile up the loch from me.” “ From time to time she will call and say there is activity in the Loch near her house and sure enough in an hour or so that turbulence comes down this way. It is quite
Exciting.”

Yes, you can visit Loch Ness any day any time. You
can see it from our Park. Please take a while to do this but don’t forget your binoculars and camera.

+ Loch Ness monster

McBain Memorial Park overlooks Loch Ness!

Monster

Questions have come to me about Loch Ness and it’s fabled monster.
Most commonly the question is “have you ever seen the monster?
The answer is NO.
“Had your father ever seen the monster?
Again the answer is NO.

 

 

But lets go a little further. My father told the family a story about meeting a woman in Inverness who was a teacher at a local Primary school. Somehow the subject came up and she said “I am the most embarrassed woman in Scotland.” When asked why she said because for 16 years I have taught my students that there was no such thing as a monster in Loch Ness. Then one early bright evening (in the summer the sun stays up until 11PM or later.) I was looking at the still water of the loch when suddenly a great swirl of water and commotion was visible not far from the shore. Then I saw a hump, then what must have been a head but it looked like a huge snake head.

Then–

It disappeared.

Historically the first recorded tale of the Monster is in the story of Saint Columba who was traveling along the side of the Loch in around 530 AD he saw a great commotion in the waters and saw a great beast he told one of his traveling guards to swim out into the Loch and find out what it was. The story continues that the Monster headed towards the swimmer with mouth agape. At this point Columba raise his staff and called out in an unnatural voice to the Monster “ STOP and go no further.”

The Monster obeyed and the swimmer was able to swim to safety.

St. Columba proceeded towards what is now the town of Inverness where he was to meet with the “magicians” of the King of Scotland named Brude. The purpose of the journey was to attempt to bring Christianity to the King and his people. But that’s another story.

The chronicler of St. Columba was a monk who first put the life of Columba in paper.

The trouble with the story is that Adaman’s account of the events at Loch Ness took place almost 100 years after it happened. The reply was that most of the history at that time was verbal or folk tales that came down from one generation to another. This was the way it was done. We assume some elaboration took place but it is all we have.

Pictures of the monster which have appeared in print from around 1910 are about 60% false. But not all.

My only time spent with someone who saw the monster fairly regularly was the post mistress of the Dores Post office. Sitting in her living room she had a grand picture window looking out on the loch just a few yards from the water. When I put the question to her she said “Well, I have a friend who lives about a mile up the loch from me.” “ From time to time she will call and say there is activity in the Loch near her house and sure enough in an hour or so that turbulence comes down this way. It is quite
Exciting.”

Yes, you can visit Loch Ness any day any time. You
can see it from our Park. Please take a while to do this but don’t forget your binoculars and camera.

Contact Us